Make Your Own Pie Crust

Better yet, make two and store one in the freezer, for a quick pie, or mini tarts. I never used to make pie and as a matter of fact I had been married over 25 years before I made my first one, and now they beg.

I have tried many combinations of different fats for the best crust, and I find an all butter or all lard crust too soft, and an all tallow crust too firm. This recipe is what works best for me.

3 cups organic white flour (yes, organic makes a huge difference, as conventional wheat is sprayed with huge amounts of herbicides, and the glyphosate is absorbed in to the wheat. Glyphosate is actually patented as an antibiotic, which is what is causing so much intestinal distress in people and animals.)
one teaspoon real salt
two teaspoons organic sugar
1/2 cup (one stick) unsalted Kerrygold butter
1/2 cup beef or lamb tallow
big spoonful of lard (do not ever use hydrogenated lard or shortening)
two teaspoons apple cider vinegar (adding vinegar helps prevent gluten from forming and will make the crust flakier. Vodka does the same thing, but why waste that in pie crust?)
2/3 cup ice cold water

If you don’t have a food processor, just get one. Of course you can also do this by hand.

Put the flour, salt and sugar in the processor and pulse until it is mixed well.

DSC_0031

Cut the cold butter into cubes and add to the processor. Pulse the machine until the butter is in tiny pieces, incorporated with the flour.

DSC_0034

Tallow, rendered properly, will be odorless and very mild, and makes for a firm flaky crust. If you don’t have tallow, you can substitute for 1/2 cup lard, or another 1/2 cup (one stick) of butter. Tallow is very hard so I jam a sharp knife in the jar to break it up a bit.

DSC_0039

Add tallow to the processor and pulse until it is in tiny pieces like the butter.

DSC_0044l

Lard from an American Guinea Hog is quite soft, but makes the texture of the pie wonderful, so I add a big spoonful if I have it.

DSC_0049

Pulse the machine until it is well incorporated.

DSC_0052

The flour/fat mixture will press together in your fingers. This is why it is so much easier in a food processor, and the heat from your hands is not going to make the crust tough.

DSC_0054a

Add the two teaspoons of apple cider vinegar, and about 2/3 cup of ice cold water.

DSC_0058

Slowly pour the liquid down the spout while you pulse the machine. Don’t overwork the dough.

DSC_0059

You will have to stop the machine from time to time and scrape the sides with a spatula to incorporate everything. Dump dough out on floured pastry mat.

DSC_0060

Gently and quickly press the dough into a rough ball.

DSC_0062

Cut in half, press into a flat, round disk, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. If you are making a pie, like pumpkin, which only has a bottom crust, you can freeze the other disk of dough for a pie another time. It takes about 30 minutes to thaw before you can roll it out.

DSC_0064

After the dough has chilled, roll it out as thin as you can.

DSC_0089

Leave about a 1/2 inch or more overhang, and trim off the excess dough.

DSC_0090

Save the trimmings to keep in a ziplock bag (suck all the air out) in the refrigerator (or freezer), to roll out for quick little tarts or tiny pies.

DSC_0091

Tuck the edge under.

DSC_0092

Pinch your thumb and finger of your left hand together on the outside of the dough and press the dough with the knuckle of your right hand, to make pretty indentations in the edge.

DSC_0093

Put the pie shells back in the refrigerator or freezer for at least 15 minutes before you fill them with filling. This will help the bottom crust not get soggy.

DSC_0108

Bake pie at 350 for 25 to 30 minutes, give or take.

DSC_0127

6 thoughts on “Make Your Own Pie Crust

  1. Pingback: Grassfood Recipe Page | grassfood.

    • Yep, me too! I am sick of trying to remember how in the world to make it every time, so I think I am pretty settled on this one. Now if I can only get that temp figured out in this contrapted oven! 😉

I would love to hear your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s